Rachelle Gilmour

Dr Rachelle Gilmour

PhD Sydney
Bromby Lecturer in Old Testament

E: rgilmour@trinity.edu.au

Rachelle completed her studies in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible at the University of Sydney (PhD), before undertaking postdoctoral research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the University of Edinburgh. She has also held positions as Senior Lecturer in Biblical Studies at BBI: The Australian Institute of Theological Education, and research fellow at the Centre for Public and Contextual Theology, Charles Sturt University. She is currently an editor for the Review of Biblical Literature and co-chair of the Society of Biblical Literature annual meeting consultation, Book of Samuel: Narrative, Theology and Interpretation. She has published on a number of different aspects of narrative art, memory and history in the books of Samuel and Kings, as well as dystopia and dialogism in the prophecy of Jeremiah. 

Current Research Areas

  • Literature, language, and background of Samuel-Kings
  • Divine violence and the portrayal of God in the Hebrew Bible
  • Memory and history in Biblical narrative; memory and prophecy
  • Ideological criticism and feminist approaches to the Hebrew Bible 

Areas for Supervision

  • Literature and theology of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible
  • Biblical Hebrew language
  • History of Israel and the ancient Near East
  • Contemporary approaches to interpretation of the Hebrew Bible 

Publications

  • “The Rejection of Saul and the Obscene Underside of the Law,” The Bible and Critical Theory, forthcoming
  • “From Anxiety to Reverence: Fear of God’s Retribution and Violence in the Book of Samuel,” Die Welt des Orients, forthcoming
  • “Remembering the Future: The Topheth as Dystopia in Jeremiah 7 and 19,” Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, forthcoming  
  • “Divine Violence and Divine Presence: Reading the Story of Uzzah and the Ark in 2 Samuel 6 with Slavoj Žižek,” Biblical Interpretation, forthcoming  
  • “Rehabilitating Rehoboam,” in Characters and Characterization in 1 and 2 Kings(ed. Keith Bodner and Benjamin Johnson; London: Bloomsbury), forthcoming 
  • “Jeremiah at the Gate: Identifying the People’s Gate in Jeremiah 17:19,” Biblische Notizen177 (2018): 75-82 
  • “Juxtaposition and reinterpretation in Joshua 1-2,” pp. 143-155 in Registers and Modes of Communication in the Ancient Near East: Getting the Message Across(ed. Kyle H. Keimer and Gillan Davis; London: Routledge, 2018)
  • “A Tale of the Unexpected: The Ending of 2 Kings 3 Re-examined,” Australian Biblical Review 65 (2017): 17-29 
  • “Reading Jeremiah 19:1–13: Integrating Diachronic and Synchronic Methodologies,” Journal of Hebrew Scriptures 17(2017)DOI: 10.5508/jhs.2017.v17.a5  
  • “Chapter 15: (Hi)story Telling in the Books of Samuel,” pp. 192-203 in The Oxford Handbook of Biblical Narrative(ed. Danna Nolan Fewell; New York: Oxford University Press, 2016)
  • “The Exodus in the Bible’s Teaching and Our Teaching of the Bible: Helping to Reconcile Faith and Critical Study of the Bible through Threshold Concept Theory,” Journal of Adult Theological Education 13 (2016): 116-127 
  • “Who Captured Jerusalem? Reading Historiography and/or Collective Memory in Samuel,” pp. 63-82 in The Books of Samuel: Stories – History – Reception(ed. Walter Dietrich; Bibliotheca Ephemeridum Theologicarum Lovaniensium; Leuven: Peeters, 2016) 
  • “Elisha,” Oxford Bibliographies Online(New York: Oxford University Press, 2016)
  • “The Function of Place Naming in 2 Samuel 5-6: A Study in Collective Memory,” Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 39 (2015): 405-431 
  • Juxtaposition and the Elisha Cycle(LHBOTS 594; London: T&T Clark, 2014)
  • “Reading a Biblical Motif: Gifts of Listed Food Provisions in the Books of Samuel,” Australian Biblical Review 61 (2013): 30-43
  • “A Note on the Horses and Chariots of Fire at Dothan,” Zeitschrift für alttestamentliche Wissenschaft 125 (2013): 308-313
  • With I. Young. “Saul’s Two Year Reign in 1 Samuel 13:1,” Vetus Testamentum 63 (2013): 150-154
  • Representing the Past: A Literary Analysis of Narrative Historiography in the Book of Samuel(VTSup. 143; Leiden: Brill, 2011) 
  • “Suspense and Anticipation in I Samuel 9:1-14,” Journal of Hebrew Scriptures 9 (2009), DOI: 10.5508/jhs.2009.v9.a10

Community Engagement