Sacraments and Christian Community (P/G)

Sacraments and Christian Community (P/G)

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Field: Systematic Theology
Unit Code(s): CT9900T (Class based)/CT9909T (Online)
Unit value: 15 points
Level: Postgraduate (Elective)
Delivery mode: Face-to-face or Online
Prerequisites: CT8010T Christian Creeds and Doing Theology
Content:

This unit explores the sacramental ministry of the church, and the centrality of action and praxis in sacramental theology, especially baptism and Eucharist, and ordained ministry in the context of the whole people of God. Covering biblical roots and early precedents, key historical turns and contemporary controversies, the course is weighted to Anglican traditions, while representing perspectives from a wide ecumenical spectrum. Students will gain a critical appreciation of sacramental theology, and engage with contemporary issues and developments.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this unit, it is expected that students will be able to:

  • articulate and synthesise the biblical roots of the enactment of the church’s sacraments
  • communicate and evaluate clearly the early precedents and key historical turns influencing contemporary theology and practice of the sacraments
  • evaluate contemporary issues and controversies relating to the gospel sacraments within an informed ecumenical framework
  • engage critically and constructively with contemporary issues and developments in sacramental theology in the face of changing contexts.
  • critically evaluate different approaches to the sacraments across ecclesial traditions.
Assessment:
  • Two seminar presentations, equivalent to 1,000 words (25%)
  • 1,500-word critical article review (25%)
  • 3,000-word essay (50%)
Recommended Reading:

*set texts recommended for purchase

Best, T.F. and D. Heller, eds. Eucharistic Worship in Ecumenical Contexts: The Lima Liturgy–And Beyond. Geneva: WCC, 1995.

Bradshaw, P. and M. Johnson. The Eucharistic Liturgies: Their Evolution and Interpretation. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2012.

Brown, R. & C. Cocksworth. On Being a Priest Today. Cambridge Mass: Cowley, 2002.

Elvey, A. et al, eds. Reinterpreting the Eucharist: Explorations in Feminist Theology and Ethics. Sheffield: Equinox, 2012.

Ghezzi, B. Sacred Passages: Bringing the Sacraments to Life. New York: Doubleday, 2003.

Green, M. Baptism. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1987.

Heller, D. Baptized into Christ: A Guide to the Ecumenical Discussion of Baptism. Geneva: World Council of Churches, 2012.

Holeton, D.R. ed. Our Thanks and Praise: The Eucharist in Anglicanism Today. Toronto: Anglican Book Centre, 1998.

Irwin, K. Models of the Eucharist. New York: Paulist Press, 2005.

Macquarrie, J. A Guide to the Sacraments. London: SCM, 1997.

Martos, J. Doors to the Sacred: A Historical Introduction to Sacrament in the Catholic Church. Rev. ed. Tarrytown, NY: Ligouri/Triumph, 2001.

Moore, R.D., et al. Understanding Four Views on the Lord’s Supper. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2007.

Power, D. Mission, Ministry and Order. New York/London: Continuum, 2008.

Ramsey, M. The Christian Priest Today. London, SPCK, 1974.

Redfern, A. Ministry and Priesthood. London: Darton, Longman & Todd, 1999.

Rowel, G. and Hall, C. The Gestures of God: explorations in sacramentality. London/New York: Continuum, 2004

Schlink, E. The Doctrine of Baptism. St Louis: Concordia, 1972.

Spinks, B.D. Early and Medieval Rituals and Theologies of Baptism: From the New Testament to the Council of Trent. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006.

Spinks, B.D. Reformation and Modern Rituals and Theologies of Baptism: From Luther to Contemporary Practices. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006.

*World Council of Churches. Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry. Geneva: WCC, 1982.

Williams, R. Eucharistic Sacrifice: The Roots of a Metaphor. Bramcote: Grove Books, 1982.

 Lecturer: The Revd Dr Don Saines
 Timetable: Offered in Semester 2 only.