Introduction to the New Testament

Introduction to the New Testament


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Field: New Testament
Unit Code(s): BN1000T (Class based)/BN1009T (online)  
Unit value: 15 points
Level: Undergraduate (level 1)
Delivery mode: Face-to-face and online 
Prerequisites: None
Prohibited Combinations: Cannot be taken if student has completed BN1000U (Introducing the Gospels: Mark) or equivalent
Content: This unit introduces students to the history, culture, literature, and theology of the New Testament. Students will study all four Gospels, the Epistles and Revelation examining issues of genre, source, canonization, and translation. Special attention will be paid to the ways the insights of critical biblical scholarship relate to the understanding of these texts in their original context, as Scripture, and their consequent meaning for Christian faith in the contemporary world.
Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this unit, it is expected that students will be able to:

  • Describe the historical, cultural, religious, and theological world of the New Testament including an awareness of key figures and dates
  • Identify the genre, setting, and themes of particular New Testament books in conversation with the whole
  • Demonstrate an awareness of critical skills and tools for exegesis, including relevant reference tools and resources
  • Integrate methodological understandings, skills, and theological reflection in the study of a New Testament passage.
Assessment:
  • Two short quizzes, equivalent to 500 words (10%)
  • 1,000-word exegetical essay (30%)
  • Weekly written synopsis (class based) or weekly discussion forum (online) of 800 words  (20%)
  • Take home preparation with two-hour final exam, equivalent to 2,000 words (40%)
Recommended Reading:

* recommended for purchase

*NRSV Bible, including the Apocryphal/Deutero-canonical Books [A study Bible (i.e., a biblical translation with notes and maps) is recommended, such as the New Oxford Annotated Bible or the HarperCollins Study Bible.]

Barrett, C. K. (ed.) The New Testament Background: Writings from Ancient Greece and the Roman Empire That Illuminate Christian Origins, San Francisco: Harper Collins, 1987.

Barton, J. The Nature of Biblical Criticism, Louisville: Westminster, 2007.

*Boring, M. Eugene, An Introduction to the New Testament: History, Literature, Theology. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2012.

Grant, R. M. Augustus to Constantine: The Rise and Triumph of Christianity in the Roman World, Louisville: Westminster, 1990.

Ehrman, B. The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christians Writings, 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

Klauck, H. J. Ancient Letters and the New Testament: A Guide to Context and Exegesis, Waco, Texas: Baylor, 2006.

Metzger, B. The Canon of the New Testament: Its Origin, Development, and Significance, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997.

 Lecturer: The Revd Dr Robyn Whitaker
 Timetable: Offered each year in Semester 2 only